Process Mining Meets Football — Process Mining Camp 2019

The eighth speaker at Process Mining Camp 2019 was Hadi Sotudeh from JADS in the Netherlands.

Earlier, we talked about how us process miners learn to spot potential process mining data everywhere. Hadi did not have to look very far. Once he found the Statsbomb dataset from the 2018 World Cup, his love of soccer drove him to investigate how he could possibly apply process mining to this football data.

Hadi was especially interested in how a football team possesses the ball on the pitch. These patterns of play could help a team to learn from mistakes. Furthermore, coaching staff could develop counter strategies for an opponent.

The challenge is that football interactions do not follow a standard process. Therefore, finding the right perspective is not easy. Hadi shows that the same data can be molded to explore many different angles. For example, one angle shows sequences of types of actions, another shows interactions between individual players, and yet another shows patterns for particular outcomes (goal or throw-in). Each of these angles gives different insights.

You do not have to be a football nerd yourself to learn something from Hadi’s talk. Watch the video as an illustration of how you as the process mining analyst can take different perspectives on the data depending on the angle that you choose.


From 15 to 24 June 2020, we will meet for our first digital edition of Process Mining Camp. This year, camp will not only be fully online and free of charge, but we are also trying out a new format.

We will get together for one live-streamed talk each day, with lots of discussion and socializing at the campfire in between. You can read more about this year’s camp format, and why we think it can create a more relaxed and engaging experience, on our updated camp website.

Take a look at the program and sign up now!

Process Mining at Vanderlande — Process Mining Camp 2019

The seventh speaker at Process Mining Camp 2019 was Boris Nikolov from Vanderlande in the Netherlands.

When you have a problem that needs to be solved immediately, you do not have the luxury to start learning about new techniques that might help you to diagnose or fix this problem — You have to rely on the tools that you already know.

Fortunately, Boris already knew how to use process mining when one of their customers in the parcel distribution center called him to solve a problem of recirculating parcels. Boris works for Vanderlande, a company that makes systems for baggage handling, and for parcel sorting and routing. Normally, parcels entering the system are scanned and routed to the right locations. However, a percentage of parcels kept on circulating.

Using the standard checks, Boris could not find the problem. So, he tried process mining and discovered the root cause: The lookup of the location of parcels in the ERP system was delayed.

Watch the video of Boris’ talk to hear the full story and to learn about his other projects in the area of logistic process automation.


From 15 to 24 June 2020, we will meet for our first digital edition of Process Mining Camp. This year, camp will not only be fully online and free of charge, but we are also trying out a new format.

We will get together for one live-streamed talk each day, with lots of discussion and socializing at the campfire in between. You can read more about this year’s camp format, and why we think it can create a more relaxed and engaging experience, on our updated camp website.

Take a look at the program and sign up now!

Process Mining at AIG — Process Mining Camp 2019

The sixth speaker at Process Mining Camp 2019 was Sudhendu Rai from AIG in the United States.

Sudhendu will be back at this year’s camp with a follow-up talk on their “Process Wind Tunnel” framework, and also another process mining case. The “wind tunnel” is AIG’s test environment in which a business process can be simulated.

I have been interested in simulation since my Ph.D. thesis. Simulation has the charm that you can test out alternative what-if scenarios to find out which improvement would have the biggest effect before actually making the change in the real-world process.

In many situations, what-if analyses can be carried out with process mining without a dedicated simulation tool. For example, you can filter your data set to those cases that already follow the desired process scenario. Then, you can use the measurements for this subset to estimate the overall process performance if all cases were to follow this new flow.

However, for more advanced re-designs of the process you need a specialized simulation tool. Combining process mining with simulation holds great potential, since the process mining tool can help you to get the right input parameters for your simulation model.

This is exactly what Sudhendu and his team did. In his talk at last year’s camp, he showed how they tested new scheduling policies for incoming policy requests.

Watch the video of Sudhendu’s talk to learn how AIG could reduce their cycle time from 12 days to 5 days (increasing the throughput by over 30%) by combining process mining with simulation.


From 15 to 24 June 2020, we will meet for our first digital edition of Process Mining Camp. This year, camp will not only be fully online and free of charge, but we are also trying out a new format.

We will get together for one live-streamed talk each day, with lots of discussion and socializing at the campfire in between. You can read more about this year’s camp format, and why we think it can create a more relaxed and engaging experience, on our updated camp website.

Take a look at the program and sign up now!

Process Mining at Philips Healthcare — Process Mining Camp 2019

The fifth speakers at Process Mining Camp 2019 were Mark Pijnenburg from Philips Healthcare and Carmen Bratosin from ESI in the Netherlands.

The term “customer journey analysis” has become a bit of a buzz word, but all it says is that you shift the perspective from yourself to the customer when analyzing a process: Instead of looking at how you, internally, are performing the process you try to understand how your customers experience interacting with your company. The goals of such a customer journey analysis are typically more qualitative, such as testing the usability.

When Mark and Carmen analyze the usage flows of Philips’ MRI machines in the field, they are not only interested in the usability, but they also want to increase the test coverage based on real-life behavior for these machines — After all, what better usage sequence to test on a new model than a sequence that was actually used by a radiologist to perform an MRI scan in the hospital? Therefore, their usage patterns contribute directly to the reliability of future versions of these machines.

Preparing the data for process mining was not easy because the logging that is produced by the MRI machines is only available on a very technical level. Furthermore, each physician has their own preferences in how they set up the machine for certain exams, which adds to the complexity.

Watch Mark and Carmen’s talk to learn how they addressed these data challenges, and see a live demo of analyzing actual MRI usage log data with process mining.


From 15 to 24 June 2020, we will meet for our first digital edition of Process Mining Camp. This year, camp will not only be fully online and free of charge, but we are also trying out a new format.

We will get together for one live-streamed talk each day, with lots of discussion and socializing at the campfire in between. You can read more about this year’s camp format, and why we think it can create a more relaxed and engaging experience, on our updated camp website.

Take a look at the program and sign up now!

Process Mining at PGGM — Process Mining Camp 2019

The fourth speakers at Process Mining Camp 2019 were Bas van Beek and Frank Nobel from PGGM in the Netherlands.

When a company starts using process mining, they face not only the challenge of understanding what process mining can do and how to use the process mining tool. They also have to find the right place for process mining in the organization.

Often, there are multiple candidate teams who could lead the development of the process mining practice. For example, many companies have both a process improvement team (working with methodologies like BPM or Six Sigma) and a data science team (working with all kinds of data analysis techniques). Now, with process mining as the new kid on the block, which of these two groups should pick this up and integrate process mining into their way of working?

At PGGM, they have a Lean Six Sigma group and a Data Science group. They approach every process mining initiative as a multi-disciplinary team with people from both groups.

The initiatives themselves can be quite different. One of them, a project in the audit space, was particularly interesting because it achieved what most process mining in audit projects are after: Not just to increase the assurance, but also to make the audit more efficient.

Watch the video to learn more about three multi-disciplinary process mining projects that Bas and Frank have performed at PGGM.


From 15 to 24 June 2020, we will meet for our first digital edition of Process Mining Camp. This year, camp will not only be fully online and free of charge, but we are also trying out a new format.

We will get together for one live-streamed talk each day, with lots of discussion and socializing at the campfire in between. You can read more about this year’s camp format, and why we think it can create a more relaxed and engaging experience, on our updated camp website.

Take a look at the program and sign up now!